Baker

Survivors of Company B on Tinian, following the Marianas campaign.
Survivors of Company B on Tinian, following the Marianas campaign.

Roster

View individual biographies of the members of Company B.

Skippers

xz_nopic b_cokin b_eddy captainswoyer
Earle C. Dunn
December, 1942 –
January 6, 1943
Milton G. Cokin
January 6, 1943 –
October 1, 1944
William A. Eddy, Jr.
October 1, 1944 –
April 10, 1945
Joseph D. Swoyer
April 14, 1945 –
End of War

Casualties

Campaign Landing Strength
(Joined Mid-Battle)
Killed Wounded Sick
(Not Returned)
Total Percent
Namur 194 22 34 0 57 29%
Saipan 222
Joined: 1
26
1
109
0
11
0
146
1
66%
100%
Tinian 136
Joined: 23
3
0
11
2
10
0
24
2
18%
8%
Iwo Jima 214
Joined: 69
28
14
140
29
1
1
169
44
79%
64%

Decorations

Decorations shown were awarded for service with Baker Company.
Posthumous awards are noted in italics.
                         Navy Cross Silver Star Bronze Star*
Namur Alex Haluchak
Fred B. Penninger
Leslie M. Chambers, Jr.
Harold R. Rediske
Paul H. Hoff
Saipan Albert J. Estergall
Robert E. Newbury
Joseph C. I. Boisclair
George F. Claar
William A. Eddy, Jr.
Tinian Joseph C. I. Boisclair
John A. Gilboy
Albert J. Estergall
PFC Kenneth W. Mosty
Richard H. Murphy
Joseph D. Swoyer
Iwo Jima  William A. Eddy, Jr. Jesse T. Betts
Richard H. Murphy
Marvin E. Opatz
Charles F. Aldinger, Jr.
Rondall M. Baird
Francis H. Brucker
Albert J. Estergall
Joseph J. McDermott
Joseph D. Swoyer
Garrison F. Tucker
* Note: Because no comprehensive list of WWII Bronze Star awards is known to exist, this category is incomplete.

6 thoughts on “Baker

  1. My Dad, Henry G. Pileckas, 1st Battalion, 24th Marines, Baker Company…..is there anybody out there that remembers him? He fought at Guam, Saipan and Tinian and then was sent to Colgate University for Officer Training.

  2. My grandfather was Donald B Strunk (Slim). He was a machine gunner and landed on Iwo Jima via the USS Hendry on February 19th. He was wounded on the 24th with shrapnel and was evacuated. He was 1st Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division (and Baker Company according to this site). Does anyone know this name? I am desperately trying to find any remaining vets who he may have served with.

  3. My father, Chester McCoy Sr., is still alive and coherent on Jan. 2021. He recalls Pileckas as his squad leader when they landed on Saipan and thought he was sent to officer training and he came back as a Lieutenant. This does not match the records on this site. Question to Joseph Pileckas – was your father a Lieutenant? Also, he recalls his sergeant had the last name Mays (Spelling??)and he was from Maine but we cannot find him on this list. He spoke with Mays at the Augusta VFW in the 60’s. Mays was a career recruiter until retirement.
    We enjoyed reviewing the photos and names. My dad was curious what happened to many of these men.

    1. Hello!

      Henry Pileckas (aka “Hammering Hank”) did indeed attend officer training; after the Mariana Islands campaign he was promoted to Platoon Sergeant and sent back to the United States to attend Colgate University on the V-12 program. Marine Corps muster rolls indicate he was at Colgate when the war ended, and did not return to the battalion. (I am not sure if he received a commission.)

      I have not seen a Sergeant Mays on Battalion muster rolls. Could you ask at which point in the war Mr. McCoy recalls being with Sergeant Mays? Perhaps there is an alternate spelling or a nickname to check.

  4. He thinks his sergeant’s name was Mays but not certain after the decades. We checked variant spellings but nothing rings a bell. He’s certain his sergeant was from Maine. Is there an easy way to check the names of sergeants in B Company from Maine? As noted in my first post, he survived all the battles and became a career recruiter. He said his sergeant really looked after him because of his age and size – he was barely 18 and 130lbs @ 5’8″. He grabbed him and another kid as they were preparing to board the Higgins boats at Roi-Namur and said, we’re gonna save you two for the second wave. The majority of KIA’s were in the first wave.

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