Saipan

The landings on Saipan as seen from one of the Navy's ships.

They patted us on the head and said, “Since ya did such a nice job at Namur, we got another one for ya. Place called Saipan!”

That’s where I dropped my first Jap. I shook like a leaf every time I killed one, until I got three of ’em. I quit shaking then.

PFC Norman Lucas, Company C, 24th Marines

Operation Forager, Phase I
June 15 – July 13, 1944

Daily narratives locked for revisions and editing, June 2020.

Prelude

NEW No One Thought Of Failure

Hitting The Fan

NEW June 15: It Hit The Fan When We Hit Saipan
June 16: An Unsavory Odor
June 17: A Serious Hindrance
June 18: Ineffective As A Striking Force
June 19: Many A Thirsty Prayer
June 20: Renewed Confidence
June 21: Position Static
June 22: A Perilous Day
June 23: The Point Of Exhaustion
June 24: Kagman

Up The Spine

June 25: Occupation Of The Point
June 26: To Sun And Lie In Shallow Water
June 27: We Sat And Watched
June 28: Automatic Artillery
June 29: Considerable Harassment
June 30: Combat Softens Any Foxhole
July 1: This Tie With The Past
July 2: Them Snipers Can Shoot!
July 3: Fish In A Barrel
July 4: Did You Have A Noisy Fourth?

Marpi Point Marathon

July 5: A Dozen Men Were Riddled
July 6: Anticipated But Unwelcome
July 7: Piling Them Up In Rows
July 8: With All They Had
July 9: I Remember The Screaming
July 10: The Island Is “Secure”
July 11: A Two-Day Southward Trek
July 12: Enjoy The Role Of Greatness
July 13: Our Last Killing
Aftermath: On To Tinian


Total Casualties, First Battalion 24th Marines.

PRESENT KIA/DOW WIA SICK
(Not Returned)

Total Casualties (Percent Effective)

Able

232 23 104 7

134 (58%)

Baker

222 26 109 11

146 (66%)

Charlie

227 25 68 15

108 (48%)

Headquarters

166 9 40 4

53 (32%)

Corpsmen

40 1 16 2

19 (48%)

Battalion Total:

887 84 337 39

460 (52%)

Replacements
(All Companies)

10 1 0 0

1 (10%)

Grand Total:

897 85 337 39

461 (51%)

Notes On This Table
Accounts for casualties sustained between June 15 and July 13, 1944, based on muster rolls for the battalion.
Includes Pvt. Marwood B. Smith (Co. B), died as a direct result of Saipan wounds on August 11, 1944.
WIA: any wound caused by enemy action, qualifying for a Purple Heart.
Does not count multiple wounds suffered by individuals.
“Sick, Not Returned”: physical ailments not qualifying for a Purple Heart, that resulted in a Marine’s evacuation through July 14.
Does not count Marines so evacuated who returned to duty on or before July 13.

7 thoughts on “Saipan

  1. looking for info on Robert nelson harris. 4th division. saipan and tinyan. ..bar ….purple heart ad gold star
    looking for history and journey. lived and died a Marine!

  2. My Father, Melvin T. Chrislip, Jr. was also wounded in action on Saipan. I have his story as well.

  3. Hello,
    I very much appreciate the most excellent work that you’ve done in gathering the data on 1st Battalion 24th Marines.
    I am in process of writing a book on the battle of Saipan, similar to my book on the Hürtgen Forest, where I will examine the 24th Marines, 165th Infantry and the 43d Division and 47th Independent Brigade Imperial Japanese Army; how they were organized, trained and combat on Saipan from the level of regiment and below. I am hoping to use some of the data on your site, with appropriate footnotes–so thank you again. The individual data that you have on individual Marines is wonderful.
    My very best regards,

    Robert S. Rush, PhD

    1. Mr. Rush, I look forward to helping out however I can. I know some researchers who specialize in the 2nd and 3rd Battalions, and would be happy to put you in touch if you would like.

  4. My grandfather was Emil Cassese. I have a daughter who is named after him, and I would love any stories or information.

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