In It From The First: The Pearl Harbor Contingent

Photo Source Of the hundreds of decorated Marines who served in 1/24, only a handful were eligible to wear this medal. The American Defense Service Medal was reserved for those who were in the service after September 8, 1939, up to and including December 7, 1941. Those who wore the medal with the “Base” clasp … More In It From The First: The Pearl Harbor Contingent

Disbanding

From the October, 1945 muster roll of 1/24. Major Irving Schechter, the last battalion commander, closed the accounts of the handful of men remaining in the battalion seventy years ago today. Most had already transferred away. The younger replacements with time to go on their enlistments were now with service and supply units. The older … More Disbanding

New Site: Fourth Marine Division Forum

A quick update for blog followers: I met a gent named Bill Michels, Jr. at the reunion. Bill’s dad, 1Lt. William Michels Sr., was a mortar section leader and Silver Star recipient serving with B/1/25. The amazing community surrounding the Fourth Marine Division became a common topic in our conversations since the reunion. Not just the … More New Site: Fourth Marine Division Forum

Final Muster: Monday

So, where’s the rest of your party? The gentleman posing this admittedly legitimate question is seated behind a folding card table in the Hospitality Room. He is the keeper of the keys that grant access to every event in the following week, flanked by an honor guard of friendly, yet stoic sailors and Marines. A … More Final Muster: Monday

Final Muster: Part I

Long story short: The Fourth Marine Division Association is folding this year. But first–there’s one last liberty call in Jacksonville, North Carolina. I got my marching orders from Gunga. The initial operations plan called for a two-pronged assault, to seize the reunion in the name of Able Company. Gunga and Tracy, old gunner and new assistant. … More Final Muster: Part I

The Letters.

In the previous post, I mentioned a lesson learned in my graduate program: history does not repeat, it echoes, and historians are responsible for those echoes. We choose how to control them. We emphasize events or omit words in the name of editing, of clarity, or willful distortion. We have to pick what to preserve because we can’t … More The Letters.